Trivia

I learned an important lesson after reading an interesting bit of trivia on the internet.

This was the trivia I stumbled upon:

  • The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho has been translated into 67 languages.
  • Sapiens by Yuval Noah Harari has been translated into 60 languages.
  • Mark Manson’s The Subtle Art of Not Giving a Fuck – 25 languages.
  • Atomic Habits by James Clear – 20 languages.

But what did I learn from this? And most importantly, why am I telling you all this? How is it relevant for you?

Let me explain. The trivia I shared above highlights an important principle –

What you have to say is more important than how you say it.

We put so much focus on language that we often forget that language is just a medium to convey our thoughts.

This is especially true for a country like India where English is considered more of a status symbol than just a language.

It has even come to a point where we give preference to a particular piece of content just because it’s written in English.

We even judge people’s critical thinking skills based on whether they can speak English or not.

That’s what the problem is.

But think about it.

There’s a reason why these books were translated into so many languages. That’s because people cared more about the content of these books than the languages they were written in.

Language, therefore, was just a medium for them.

Here’s a personal example. I prefer writing in English and speaking in Hindi.

But writing in English doesn’t make me superior and speaking in Hindi doesn’t make me inferior to anyone.

This is an important distinction to understand.

So choose the language that you are most comfortable with and take pride in it. 

Try to be a person who has something valuable to say irrespective of the language.

For example, it doesn’t matter how eloquently you write or speak, if at the end of the day, all you do is spread hate.

One last thing. I’m not asking you to stop learning other languages. Languages are skills that you should build.

But only think of them as skills, not a measure of your worth.

That’s the point I’m trying to make.


Thanks for reading. I am Shikhil Vyas, a technical content writer and blogger. If you liked reading it, you can support me by buying me a coffee.

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